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Federal Funding Opportunities for Summer Learning
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21st CCLC Program   •   CNCS   •   Summer Meals   •   STEM


Federal Funding Programs Available to Summer Programs
  


ACE Academy

Program overview: ACE Academy is an interactive summer experience for high school, middle school, and elementary school students who are interested in aviation and aerospace. The Federal Aviation Administration, along with many other private organizations, sponsor ACE Academy camps in several U.S. states, Students learn lessons in flight planning, aviation history, and the physics of flight; get instruction on aircraft design and maintenance; take field trips to aviation sites; take flight simulations and, in some locations, flights in aircraft.

Type of assistance: Summer aviation career exploration for high, middle, or elementary school students.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Adult Education and Family Literacy Act
Program overview: The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA), authorized under Title II of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), is the primary Federal program that provides foundation skills below the postsecondary level and English literacy instruction for out-of-school youth and adults. The program seeks to assist students in acquiring the skills and knowledge necessary to become productive workers, parents and citizens, and transition to postsecondary education and training. The AEFLA Basic Grants to States program is the major source of Federal support for basic skills programs. AEFLA eligible providers may use funding for AEFLA programs during the summer months. The required and allowable uses of funds are the same for AEFLA programs offered during the academic year and summer.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: $589 million in FY2016

Assets for Independence (AFI)
Program overview: AFI grantees enroll low-income persons to save income in Individual Development Accounts (IDA) which will be matched by federal and non-federal funds. Youth that participate in employment opportunities can save their wages in IDAs and receive matched funds.

Type of assistance: Competitive grants to non-profits or joint non-profit and government initiatives.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Byrne Justice Assistance Grant (JAG)
Program overview: The Byrne JAG Program is the leading source of federal justice funding to state and local jurisdictions. JAG funds may be used for state and local initiatives, technical assistance, strategic planning, research and evaluation (including forensics), data collection, training, personnel, equipment, forensic laboratories, supplies, contractual support, and criminal justice information systems that will improve or enhance such areas as:
     • Prevention and education programs.
     • Corrections and community corrections programs.
     • Drug treatment and enforcement programs.
     • Planning, evaluation, and technology improvement programs.

JAG funds are primarily administered through State Administering Agencies (SAAs). Communities can contact their SAA to determine how JAG funding is being used for local initiatives and whether violence reduction and prevention resources for employment are available.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states then localities.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.


Carol M. White Physical Education Program

Program overview: to initiate, expand, or enhance physical education programs, including before school, after school, and summer programs for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Grant recipients must implement programs that help students make progress toward meeting their state’s standards for physical education.

Type of assistance: Discretionary/competitive grants.

State data: Awards for this program can be found here.

Funding status: $47 million for FY2016

Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP)
Program overview: Grants support activities that serve youth who are likely to remain in foster care and youth who have “aged out” of foster care. Activities include, but are not limited to, help with education, employment and financial management. Funds can be used to target foster care youth with summer education and employment opportunities.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (CBCAP)
Program overview: CBCAP programs focus on building a strong base of support for families and communities in child abuse prevention. Prevention programs include positive youth development, which may include opportunities for youth to complete the challenges of adolescence and childhood. Summer educational and career opportunities can be created using these funds targeting at-risk youth.

Type of assistance: Formula grant allocated to states.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Program overview: The CDBG program provides annual grants on a formula basis to states and entitled metropolitan cities and urban counties (generally, cities with a population of 50,000 or more and counties with a population of 200,000 or more). It is authorized by Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, to implement a wide variety of community and economic development activities such as neighborhood revitalization, economic development and the provision of improved community facilities and services. Local governments and states may use their funding from HUD’s CDBG program for job training and mentoring programs for youth.

Type of assistance: Formula grants.

State data: Data on CDBG expenditures by governmental unit can be found here. Data on CDBG programs and accomplishments by governmental unit can be found here.

Funding status: $3 billion for FY2016

Community Services Block Grant (CSBG)
Program overview: States allocate funds to local Community Action Agencies (CAAs) to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in communities. Across the country approximately 1000 CAAs operate a range of programs including summer youth employment projects. CAAs could help support summer employment programs by providing additional support services to youth or even perhaps subsidizing a certain number of positions. CAAs are good sites to provide subsidized employment opportunities. Many CAAs offer financial capability services that can help youth get banked, and learn how to manage and save their income.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states, disbursed to local Community Action Agencies.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
Program overview: The Child Care Development Block Grant (CCDBG) within CCDF can support summer program through grants to programs that provide child care assistance for working families.

Type of assistance: Grants to states become reimbursements to families and programs.

State data: Data on state CCDF activities can be found here.

Funding status: $2.76 billion for FY2016, an increase of $326 million

Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS)
Program overview: The Corporation for National and Community Service programs engage members in direct service and capacity-building to address critical community needs. The grant applicant designs service activities for members serving full-or –part-time positions for one year or during the summer. A STEM-specific AmeriCorps program places members in STEM programs. The CNCS Youth Opportunity AmeriCorps program employs at-risk and formerly incarcerated youth in service projects. The CNCS Social Innovation Fund makes grants to experienced grant-making “intermediaries” that are well-positioned within communities to identify the most promising programs and provide funding, technical assistance, and evaluation support.

Americorps
Program overview:  Provides financial support to public and nonprofit organizations to recruit, train, and place AmeriCorps members to meet community needs in disaster services, economic opportunity, education, the environment, health, and veterans and military families. AmeriCorps grants can support full-time or part-time (including summer) service positions.
Type of assistance: Competitive and formula grants (national and state) are awarded to national, state, and local nonprofit organizations, community and faith-based organizations, higher education institutions, and state and local governments.
State data: Data sets for CNCS programs can be found here.
Funding status: Approximately $363.6 million in 2016

Americorps Approved National Service Positions
Program overview: Provides a process through which CNCS designates service activity as approved national service positions. The CEO of CNCS can designate summer service project activities that are funded with non-CNCS resources and meet certain criteria as national service positions. The designation allows individuals serving in the position to receive post-service education awards at the end of their term of service that can be used to pay education expenses.
Type of assistance: Designation by the CEO of CNCS that a service position is an approved national service position under the national service laws.
State data: Data sets for CNCS programs can be found here.
Funding status: No funding available other than end-of-service education awards for individuals

Americorps Vista
Program overview: AmeriCorps VISTA members live and serve in some of our nation’s poorest urban and rural areas. With passion, commitment, and hard work, they create or expand programs designed to bring individuals and communities out of poverty. Each AmeriCorps VISTA member makes a year-long, full-time commitment to serve on a specific project at a nonprofit organization or public agency. The VISTA Summer Associate program offers individuals the opportunity to become engaged in a community through an existing VISTA project for 8 or 10 weeks during the summer. AmeriCorps VISTA encourages existing sponsors and partners who work with disadvantaged youth to consider using the Summer Associates program to enhance their existing programs as appropriate by providing opportunities to engage disadvantaged youth in productive service activities in the summer.
Type of assistance: Non-competitive national service program.
State data: Data sets for CNCS programs can be found here.
Funding status: Approximately $92 million in 2016


Economic Development Administration (EDA)
Program overview: The EDA is the only federal government agency focused exclusively on economic development and plays a critical role in fostering regional economic development efforts in communities across the nation. Through strategic investments that foster job creation and attract private investment, EDA supports development in economically distressed areas of the United States. EDA has established relationships with local and national employers which can be leveraged to obtain employment opportunities.

Type of assistance: Local/national agency outreach to employers.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)
Program overview: The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was reauthorized as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in 2015. Since first signed into law in 1965, the purpose of ESEA has been to foster equal and equitable high-quality educational opportunities for all public school students. Several funding programs within ESEA can be used for summer learning, including the 21st Century Community Learning Center program, the only federal funding stream dedicated for summer and other out-of-school time programs.

21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) (Title IV Part B)
Program overview: Grant recipients may use the funds to carry out a broad array of activities before and after school (including those held during summer recess periods) to advance student achievement among students who attend low-performing schools. Eligible entities may apply for sub-grants to establish 21st CCLC program sites that deliver summer educational and enrichment opportunities. A State may use available funds to expand or enhance current activities among existing or new 21st CCLC sub-grantees. States may use State and program-site-based performance data and other evidence-based practices to develop summer learning programs that would yield measurable results.
Type of assistance: Formula grants are awarded to state educational agencies (SEAs), which then award competitive grants to eligible entities, including local educational agencies (LEAs), community-based organizations (CBOs), and other public and private entities.
State data: State tables here list the amount of funding granted to each state for its 21st CCLC program. 
Funding status: $1.167 billion for FY2016, a $15 million increase

Title I, Part A
Program overview:  Grants provide financial assistance to local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools with high numbers or high percentages of children from low-income families to help them meet challenging state academic standards. Title I funds may be used to provide summer learning opportunities to eligible students. In a schoolwide program, all students are eligible; in a targeted assistance program, only students from low-income families are eligible. If an LEA or school wants to provide summer learning opportunities that include both academic and non-academic enrichment activities, it might use Title I, Part A funds, as appropriate, for the academic component and partner with community organizations to provide the non-academic activities. Title I funds may also be used for summer activities designed to help prepare eligible students for the upcoming school year.
Type of assistance: Formula grants to local educational agencies (LEAs).
State data: Your state education agency has data on Title I funding allocation, usually managed by a dedicated Title I administrator or office.
Funding status: $14,909 billion for Title I, a $500 million increase

Migrant Education Program (MEP) (Title I, Part C)
Program overview: Funds support education programs for migratory children and help ensure that migratory children who move among the states are not penalized in any manner by disparities among states in curriculum, graduation requirements, or state academic content and student academic achievement standards. A summer program which has migratory children as a target audience could use these funds to provide educational and support opportunities, such as vocational instruction, health services, and academic instruction.
Type of assistance: Formula grants to states.
State data: Grant amounts by state can be found here.
Funding status: $374.5 million for FY2016, level-funded

School Improvement Grants (SIG)
Program overview: SIG is a Title I program whereby LEAs use SIG funds to implement one of four specified school improvement models in the lowest performing schools. Both the Transformation model and the Turnaround model require extended learning time, which can include summer programming. 
Type of assistance: Formula grants are made to states, which then award competitive grants to LEAs.
State data: Awards of SIG funds to states can be found here. Look for local award information on your SEA web site.
Funding status: $450 million for FY2016, a $55 million decrease

Title II, Part A
Program overview: LEAs may use funds to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers, and for professional development activities for teachers and principals. Professional development activities supported by Title II, Part A funds can take place during the school day, after school, in workshops, and during summer.
Type of assistance: Formula grants to SEAs, which then make formula-based sub-grants to LEAs.
State data: Awards by state can be found here
Finding status: $2.349 billion for FY2016, level-funded


Every Kid In A Park
Program overview: As part of President Obama’s commitment to protect our nation’s unique outdoor spaces and ensure that every American has the opportunity to visit and enjoy them, the Every Kid in a Park initiative allows fourth graders nationwide to go to www.everykidinapark.gov and obtain a pass for free entry for them and their families to more than 2,000 federally managed lands and waters nationwide for an entire year starting September 1, 2015. Parents, teachers, and community organizations can lead fun, educational outings for kids currently in the 4th grade to any national park, national forest, or other federal land or water site across the country. More information to help plan trips is available at the Every Kid in a Park website, and Scholastic has developed lesson plans and activities that are available here.

Type of assistance: Free entry to federally managed lands and waters for fourth graders.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Jobs Plus
Program overview: The purpose of the Jobs Plus Pilot program is to develop locally-based, job-driven approaches to increase earnings and advance employment outcomes through work readiness, employer linkages, job placement, educational advancement, technology skills, and financial literacy for residents of public housing. The place-based Jobs Plus Pilot program addresses poverty among public housing residents by incentivizing and enabling employment through earned income disregards for working families, and a set of services designed to support work including employer linkages, job placement and counseling, educational advancement, and financial counseling. Funded Public Housing Authorities may use their funding from the Jobs Plus grant for job training and mentoring for youth.

Type of assistance: Competitive grants.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Museums for All
Program overview: Museums participating in Museums for All offer low-income families with EBT cards free or reduced-price admission. Participants in summer learning programs that come from families that have EBT cards can attend museums at low cost.

Type of assistance: Subsidized education opportunities.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

My Money
Program overview: This website is a one-stop-shop for free, reliable and unbiased information from more than 20 federal agencies with financial education resources for youth and adults. This resource can be used to supplement financial literacy education opportunities or youth accounts established for the summer.

Type of assistance: Financial education resources.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.
 

myRA
Program overview: MyRA accounts are Roth Individual Retirement Accounts that have no start-up costs, no fees, and no minimum contribution. The money deposited into a myRA is backed by the U.S. Treasury and carries no risk of losing money. Youth that participate in summer employment opportunities can use myRA accounts to save some of their earnings.

Type of assistance: Retirement savings account.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

National Summer Transportation Institute (NSTI)
Program overview: NSTI is a two to four-week program creates awareness of transportation careers by encouraging and motivating secondary school students to pursue transportation-related careers. Students actively participate in a series of academic courses within the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math related to the transportation industry. Since its inception, more than 9,000 students and over 40 minority serving institutions (MSIs) have participated in NSTI. Each summer, NSTI promotes transportation awareness and career opportunities among disadvantaged and at-risk middle and high school students around the country.

Type of assistance: National/Regional agency connecting at-risk secondary school students to transportation opportunities.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
Program overview: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has several funding programs targeted at preventing juvenile delinquency through mentoring and other structured summer and afterschool programming.

Type of assistance: Most programs are competitive grants.

State data:  Data on OJJDP programs can be found here.

Funding status: $90 million for FY2016, level-funded

Perkins Career and Technical Education
Program overview: Perkins grants support career and technical education that enables secondary students to graduate from high school and transition into postsecondary education, training, and employment in in-demand occupations. Perkins grants also support postsecondary students and adults in obtaining industry recognized credentials and postsecondary certificates or degrees, or degrees that lead to employment in those sectors and occupations. States and eligible sub-recipients may use funds for career and technical education programs throughout the year, including summer courses, provided they meet requirements of the Perkins statute.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states, then formula grants from states to eligible sub-recipients.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: $1.12 billion in FY2016

Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP)
Program overview: PREP programs are designed to educate adolescents on both abstinence and contraception and to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Using PREP funds, an educational program can be designed for youth which includes career development opportunities.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Promise Neighborhoods
Program overview: Eligible applicants must partner with at least one target school that is low-performing and, among other things, implement a school intervention model that may include increased learning time (which means using a longer school day, week, or extended year schedule to significantly increase the total number of school hours to include additional time). Funds are limited to Promise Neighborhood communities/grantees.

Type of assistance: Competitive grants that support the development and implementation of a comprehensive, evidence-based continuum of coordinated services for children living in some of America’s most distressed communities. Eligible entities are (1) local nonprofit organizations, (2) institutions of higher education, and (3) Native American tribes.

State data: Find the list of awards here.

Funding status:  $73.3 million for FY2016, a $16.5 million increase

Recipes for Healthy Kids and a Healthy Environment
Program overview: This nine-lesson program was designed to excite kids about environmental health and empower them to take steps in their everyday lives to improve the environment for their community and reduce their environmental risk. The lessons are geared toward children ages 9 - 13. The program encourages kids to actively explore the environments in which they live and play. It is geared toward use in out-of-school programs, extracurricular groups, and after-school clubs.

Type of assistance: Education planning.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Section 3
Program overview: Construction, all aspects of operation and maintenance. HUD grantees can offer summer employment and training opportunities for local youth.

Type of assistance: Legislative mandate—there is no direct funding associated with Section 3. Section 3 is a requirement of certain sources of HUD funding to provide jobs, training and contracts to local low-income persons and businesses that employ those persons.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Summer Jobs And Beyond: Career Pathways for Youth Grants (CPY)
Program overview: The CPY grants are designed to provide resources to Local Workforce Development Boards (LWDBs) to expand and enhance existing summer employment programs and work experiences throughout the year for eligible youth and to implement innovative practices. The grants will require partnerships between LWDBs and local summer employment programs, employers, Local Education Agencies (LEAs), and re-engagement centers. Other community partners may provide services to eligible youth that assist in the development of work experience and entry into career pathways. CPY grants are also intended to strengthen the alignment of partnerships under WIOA, in which LWDBs and partners collaborate to expand capacity to serve youth entering the workforce. The purpose of these grants is to bring together all of the youth employment programs within a local community.

Type of assistance: Competitive grants to Local Workforce Development Boards.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.

Skills for Success
Program overview: The Skills for Success program from the Department of Education supports LEAs and partners in implementing, evaluating, and refining tools and approaches for developing the non-cognitive skills of middle-grades students in order to increase student success.

Type of assistance: Discretionary grants to LEAs, which can be in partnership with community-based organizations.

State data: This program was new in 2015. Awards information can be found here.

Funding status: $3 million for FY2016, a $1 million increase

Summer Food Service Program (SFSP)
Program overview: Approved sponsors serve meals that meet federal nutritional guidelines. The National School Lunch Program also provides reimbursements to summer programs that are school-sponsored and have a school food service department that is willing to provide healthy snacks and meals. Free meals can be offered to participants in summer employment and learning opportunities in partnership with current Summer Meal sites or with the creation of a new site.

Type of assistance: Reimbursements to approved sponsors through the state agencies.

State data: Locate summer meals providers in your community here.  Find data on state participation in the program here.

Funding status: $22.1 billion for all Child Nutrition Programs for FY2016, including $23 million to continue summer food demonstration projects

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
Program overview: States and tribes receive flexible block grants to design and operate programs that accomplish one of the purposes of the TANF program. One of the four purposes of the TANF program is to reduce the dependency of needy parents by promoting job preparation, work, and marriage. TANF funds can be used to support afterschool and summer activities for youth while their parents, who are eligible for the program, work.

Type of assistanceTANF funds are allocated to states.

State data: Data on TANF expenditures and programs can be found here.

Funding status: $16,739 billion for FY2016, a $2 million increase

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Youth Program
Program overview: WIOA programs developed by local workforce investment areas provide employment and education opportunities to youth that face barriers to development. Funds can be used to pay wages and operational costs for summer jobs.

Type of assistance: Formula grants to states and local areas.

State data: Reporting on Department of Labor programs can be found here.

Funding status: $873 million for FY2016, a $41 million increase

WTS Transportation YOU
Program overview: Transportation YOU is a hands-on, interactive, mentoring program that offers young girls ages 13-18 an introduction to a wide variety of transportation careers. WTS Chapters are located in several cities throughout the country and can be used to make a difference in the lives of young girls by offering programs and activities that will spark their interest in all modes of transportation and STEM.

Type of assistance: Partnership with local/national organization connecting young girls to transportation careers.

State data: Information coming soon.

Funding status: Information coming soon.


 
 
 
 
 
21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) (Title IV Part B)
Program overview: Grant recipients may use the funds to carry out a broad array of activities before and after school (including those held during summer recess periods) to advance student achievement among students who attend low-performing schools. Eligible entities may apply for sub-grants to establish 21st CCLC program sites that deliver summer educational and enrichment opportunities. A State may use available funds to expand or enhance current activities among existing or new 21st CCLC sub-grantees. States may use State and program-site-based performance data and other evidence-based practices to develop summer learning programs that would yield measurable results.
Type of assistance: Formula grants are awarded to state educational agencies (SEAs), which then award competitive grants to eligible entities, including local educational agencies (LEAs), community-based organizations (CBOs), and other public and private entities.
State data: State tables here list the amount of funding granted to each state for its 21st CCLC program. 
Funding status: $1.167 billion for FY2016, a $15 million increase
 
Title I, Part A
Program overview:  Grants provide financial assistance to local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools with high numbers or high percentages of children from low-income families to help them meet challenging state academic standards. Title I funds may be used to provide summer learning opportunities to eligible students. In a schoolwide program, all students are eligible; in a targeted assistance program, only students from low-income families are eligible. If an LEA or school wants to provide summer learning opportunities that include both academic and non-academic enrichment activities, it might use Title I, Part A funds, as appropriate, for the academic component and partner with community organizations to provide the non-academic activities. Title I funds may also be used for summer activities designed to help prepare eligible students for the upcoming school year.
Type of assistance: Formula grants to local educational agencies (LEAs).
State data: Your state education agency has data on Title I funding allocation, usually managed by a dedicated Title I administrator or office.
Funding status: $14,909 billion for Title I, a $500 million increase
 
Migrant Education Program (MEP) (Title I, Part C)
Program overview: Funds support education programs for migratory children and help ensure that migratory children who move among the states are not penalized in any manner by disparities among states in curriculum, graduation requirements, or state academic content and student academic achievement standards. A summer program which has migratory children as a target audience could use these funds to provide educational and support opportunities, such as vocational instruction, health services, and academic instruction.
Type of assistance: Formula grants to states.
State data: Grant amounts by state can be found here.
Funding status: $374.5 million for FY2016, level-funded
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